It’s no secret that President Obama’s use of executive orders to transform workplace laws was unprecedented. But perhaps even more unprecedented is how quickly those efforts have been derailed by the Trump administration. From NLRB appointments, to safety standards, to persuader-disclosure and joint-employment rules—to name a few—the White House has been systematically reversing workplace rules that President Obama implemented through executive orders, rather than through Congress.

Now, add two more hits to the list.

Obama-Era Overtime Rule Takes Final Hit.

The first hit was the final blow to President Obama’s  controversial overtime rule, which sought to expand the number of workers eligible for overtime compensation. In November 2016, a Texas federal district court preliminarily enjoined the rule just before it was due to take effect. The Department of Justice (DOJ) subsequently appealed that decision to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.

On  August 31, 2017, with the Fifth Circuit appeal pending, the district court made its final determination that the rule was invalid. Specifically the court held, as it had opined in November, that the overtime rule exceeded the Department of Labor’s (DOL’s) rulemaking authority because it focused too heavily on employees’ salary levels—rather than the nature of their job duties—in determining overtime eligibility. The court found that this was contrary to the intent of the Fair Labor Standards Act and granted summary judgment to the plaintiffs.

On September 5, 2017, at the Direction of President Trump and Attorney General Sessions, the DOJ asked the Fifth Circuit to dismiss its appeal of the preliminary injunction. The Court granted the request on September 6 and dismissed the appeal, thus leaving the overtime rule all but permanently invalidated. As a result, the minimum salary for exempt status under the FLSA remains at $23,600.

So what’s next?

Technically, the DOL still has until September 30, 2017 to appeal the district court’s August 31 decision. An appeal is highly unlikely. What is more likely is that the DOL will go back to the drawing board to develop and issue a new revised overtime rule. Current Secretary of Labor Alex Acosta previously stated that he believes the salary threshold should be raised to $33,600 (substantially lower than the Obama overtime rule’s roughly $47,000 threshold), and in July 2017, the DOL issued a request for public comment on potential revisions to the Obama overtime rule. The deadline to submit comments is September 25, 2017, with a revised rule expected to issue thereafter. Employers should stay tuned for further updates.

Obama-Era Revisions to EEO-1 Form Abandoned

The second recent hit  to President Obama’s workplace-law overhaul is the White House’s announcement suspending the Obama administration’s changes to the EEO-1 form. The revised EEO-1 form would have gone into effect March 31, 2018, and would have required employers with 100 or more employees and federal contractors with 50 or more workers to report W-2 wage information and total hours worked for all employees by race, ethnicity and sex within 12 proposed pay bands. The Obama administration had claimed that rewriting the form would help identify and reduce workplace wage discrimination. Opponents argued, on the other hand, that the new form was overly burdensome and would do little to accomplish its stated purpose, primarily because the aggregated pay data required for the form would not have compared people in the same job positions or controlled for the many other non-discriminatory variables that impact compensation. The time for reporting was also problematic, since it did not match the calendar year periods utilized by most HRIS programs.

On August 29, 2017,  the White House Office of Management and Budget agreed with the opponents and stated that the pay collection and reporting requirements “lack practical utility, are unnecessarily burdensome, and do not adequately address privacy and confidentiality issues.” The White House explained its reasoning in a letter to the Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Victoria Lipnic.

So what’s next?

As a result of the announcement, the EEOC must publish a notice in the Federal Register announcing the immediate stay of new compensation and hours worked reporting requirements contained in the revised EEO-1 form and “confirming that businesses may use the previously approved EEO-1 form in order to comply with their reporting obligations for FY 2017.” Additionally, employers will not need to submit 2017 data until March 31, 2018.

This decision is welcome news for employers who have been struggling with the practical and potentially expensive challenges of complying with the new EEO-1 Form, including how to merge systems and payroll data to accurately and efficiently collect and calculate the requisite information. Nevertheless, as we previously posted, pay equity is an increasingly scrutinized issue—with more and more states passing laws imposing pay transparency obligations and prohibiting salary history inquiries of applicants. As such, employers should continue to stay abreast of these changes and ensure that compensation determinations are adequately documented and made in compliance with applicable laws.

183809648-57a54ae55f9b58974ab92602As my colleague Keith Ashmus recently noted, most employers currently ask job applicants for their salary histories. This is a reasonable question, and one that employers find useful to help attract and retain talented employees. Given recent legislative initiatives and judicial decisions on this topic, however, employers should tread carefully.

In the past few weeks, both the state of Oregon and New York City have joined a growing list of jurisdictions that restrict employer inquiries into job applicants’ salary histories. Other states include California and Massachusetts, while other notable cities include Philadelphia, New Orleans, and Pittsburgh. At least 20 other states and many other cities are considering similar legislation. Several of these laws impose fines on employers for violations, and some even include potential jail time.

By way of example, the New York City law, which took effect last month, makes it an “unlawful discriminatory practice” for employers: (1) “to inquire about the salary history of an applicant for employment;” or (2) “to rely on the salary history of an applicant in determining the salary, benefits or other compensation for such applicant during the hiring process, including the negotiation of a contract.”

“Salary history” is broadly defined to include an applicant’s “current or prior wage, benefits or other compensation.” This concept does not, include, however, any “objective measure of the applicant’s productivity, such as revenue, sales or other production reports.” “Inquiry” is likewise broadly defined as “any question or statement to an applicant, an applicant’s current or prior employer, or a current or former employee or agent of the applicant’s current or prior employer, in writing or otherwise, for the purpose of obtaining an applicant’s salary history.” The inquiry restriction includes searching publicly available records.

Even for employers who operate in jurisdictions that do not prohibit salary-history inquiries—such as Ohio—other laws may limit the extent to which such information may be used in determining compensation. According to the  Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (which includes Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky, and Tennessee), for example, the federal Equal Pay Act prohibits employers from relying on salary history as the sole justification for paying two otherwise-equal employees differently, particularly if those employees are different genders.

With these issues in mind, multi-state employers should ensure that they do not run afoul of any state or local laws regarding the procurement or use of salary history. Additionally, all employers should also be cautious when considering salary history as a lone or significant factor in setting compensation, particularly in light of the potential for perpetuating gender pay disparities. Employers should, at a minimum:

  • Avoid relying on salary history as the lone determination of starting pay;
  • Periodically review compensation practices to ensure non-discriminatory and equitable treatment;
  • Document market factors that contribute to any discretionary determination of starting pay, including the individual’s education, prior experience, special skills, and expertise, individual negotiations by the candidate, market factors, and other job-related factors; and
  • Comply with state and local laws regarding salary history inquiries and use of prior salaries in making compensation determinations (and stay abreast of increasing changes).

Forms-2It’s no secret that Donald Trump is fulfilling his signature campaign promise to address immigration reform. So far, most of the media attention has been on the U.S.-Mexico border wall and the travel/refugee ban. For employers, however, other issues require attention.

One major issue requiring employers’ attention is I-9 compliance. In an Executive Order issued on January 25, 2017, titled “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” President Trump directed all executive agencies to prioritize the enforcement of U.S. immigration laws. Such enforcement will very likely include more frequent and significant  audits and investigations of employers’ I-9 compliance.

A few days earlier, on January 21, 2017, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services began requiring employers to use a new version of the I-9 form for all new hires. Employers who fail to use the proper form can be subject to civil penalties exceeding $2,000 for every improper form used. Thus, hiring 10 employees with the expired I-9 form can trigger 10 separate penalties.

Here is a link to the new form and instructions for completing it: https://www.uscis.gov/i-9. Note that unlike prior versions, the instructions are now contained in a separate document and are more detailed.

Otherwise, the new form itself contains only a few minor changes (for example, permitting the use of a P.O. Box for an address). However, there is now an “electronic” version available that includes drop-down menus and informational pop-up boxes to facilitate correct completion. This version is not mandatory, so employers can still print and complete the I-9 by hand.

While the I-9 form has been around for a number of years, its requirements are technical and proper completion requires solid training. Particularly with the new administration’s heavy immigration focus, we strongly recommend that  employers audit their I-9 processes, ensuring that all forms are properly completed and that all employees are authorized for employment in the U.S.

If you have any questions about I-9 compliance, please contact us.

BlockedIn a much-welcomed eleventh-hour ruling yesterday, the United States District Court in the Eastern Division of Texas issued a preliminary injunction enjoining the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) from implementing changes to overtime rules under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) (the “Final Rule”). The Final Rule, which nearly doubles the salary threshold for the overtime exemption, was scheduled to take effect on December 1, 2016. The injunction blocks the Rule, for now. For more information on what the Final Rule would mean for you or your company, click here.

In his Memorandum Opinion and Order, Judge Mazzant found that the Final Rule’s salary increase has the effect of excluding from the exemption some 4.2 million workers who are performing exempt-type work, and that this exclusion conflicts with the FLSA.

The Court imposed the injunction nationwide, not just within its jurisdiction. Thus, the injunction blocks (or at least delays) the Final Rule for all employers.

This is not the end. The judge’s ruling is only temporary, and could be overturned later by the same court or a higher one (including the United States Supreme Court). What is certain, however, is that the Final Rule will not go into effect on December 1, 2016 as previously expected.

So what should employers do now?

If you have already changed your compensation structure to conform to the new rule, it might be unpopular to reverse those changes, although you may have the right to do so-at least temporarily. Conversely, if you were waiting until December 1 to make any changes, you may now wait until the courts (or Congress) render a final decision. It will definitely be worth watching to see what action the new administration takes with regard to defending or disowning the Final Rule, since the litigation is certainly not going to be completed before January 20, 2017.

Sick-Leave-Sign-2-smallThe U.S. Department of Labor recently released its final rule requiring federal contractors and subcontractors to provide their employees with paid sick leave each year. This rule implements Executive Order 13706, which President Obama signed in September 2015. The rule takes effect on November 29, 2016, though generally it applies only to new contracts that are awarded on or after January 1, 2017. Nevertheless, covered contractors should begin taking steps to comply with the rule soon.

Under the rule, employees are entitled to one hour of paid leave for every 30 hours worked, up to a maximum of 56 hours of leave per year. Alternatively, contractors may provide 56 hours of leave to employees at the beginning of each year. In either case, the leave must generally carry over from year to year. In some situations, however, the amount of available leave can be capped at 56 hours.

Employees may use the leave for their own illness, preventative treatment or other health care needs, or to care for a family member or domestic partner. Employees may also use the leave in certain domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking situations.

The rule does not apply to all employees of a covered contractor, but only to those who perform work in connection with a covered contract. There is also a short-term exemption for employees who are governed by a collective-bargaining agreement, if the CBA provides at least 56 hours of paid time off that may be used for sickness- and health- related reasons. These contractors have until the CBA expires or January 1, 2020 (whichever comes first) to comply with the rule.

Because non-compliance can result in significant penalties, including a possible three-year debarment, contractors should review their existing sick leave policies and ensure compliance with the rule before it takes effect. Contractors should also familiarize themselves with the various procedures governing leave administration, including leave tracking, employee notice, and health care-provider certifications.