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Brian is the Chair of the firm’s Labor and Employment Practice Group and is named to the prestigious Chambers USA: America’s Guide to Leading Lawyers for Business in the area of Employment and Labor.

Brian focuses his practice on the representation of management in all phases of labor relations and employment litigation. Brian regularly represents employers in litigation before federal and state courts, administrative agencies and arbitrators involving employment discrimination and harassment, wrongful discharge, theft of trade secrets, breaches of non-compete agreements and other employment contract topics. Brian also has extensive experience counseling employers on employment topics ranging from FMLA and ADA compliance to reduction in workforce planning and implementation. In the labor relations area, Brian has significant experience in collective bargaining negotiation, union avoidance techniques and strike disputes. Brian has also developed and implemented personnel policies and in-house training programs on a variety of labor and employment law topics.

The recent spate of mass shootings in the U.S. is understandably causing many employers to re-examine their workplace weapons policies. As with all workplace issues, however, employers should be careful to make sure their policies comply with applicable laws. Ohio law, for example, has for years prohibited employers from banning firearms and ammunition from their

Although the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team’s pay discrimination settlement this week was notable for its $24 million price tag, it is also notable because it highlights the very real risk that employers face over unequal pay practices.

Members of the USWNT originally filed the case in 2019 accusing U.S. Soccer (the sport’s governing body)

Did the federal government overreach when it issued emergency rules forcing employers to impose vaccine mandates? The United States Supreme Court will take up that important question today when it examines emergency COVID-19 vaccine rules issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

The Supreme Court

A recent barrage of federal injunctions has caused substantial confusion for employers who were preparing to comply with federal vaccine mandates, including mandates involving OSHA, CMS and federal contractors. As a result, many covered employers are re-evaluating their plans to take the following points into consideration:

  1. The federal injunctions stop the government from forcing certain

Almost immediately after the FDA issued full approval of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine earlier this week, employers began rolling out mandatory vaccination policies. These policies are raising a variety of legal and practical questions for employers, including whether employers are required to compensate employees for time spent getting the vaccine.

Although the answer to this

The EEOC issued significant new guidance today covering workplace COVID-19 vaccination policies and practices. Click Here to View.  The EEOC’s new guidance answers several of the frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccination policies.

Some of the most notable answers in the new EEOC guidance include the following:

  • Employers can require all employees who physically enter

According to new guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor, workers who refused jobs that they viewed as unsafe for COVID-19 reasons may now be eligible to collect unemployment benefits. The DOL published this guidance on February 25 in keeping with President Biden’s promise to provide unemployment benefits to workers who chose unemployment over exposure

On Monday, December 14, electors will gather in every state and in Washington D.C. to cast their Electoral College votes. The outcome of that vote will almost certainly start the final countdown toward significant changes in labor and employment law under the incoming Biden administration. While we do not yet know the full extent of

As the November election draws closer, employers are facing the daunting challenge of keeping peace among employees with differing political affiliations. One approach to this challenge involves simply banning certain types of political expression in the workplace. While this approach can work well if it is done correctly, it can cause significant legal issues if

As businesses in Ohio and across the country continue reopening, many employees are refusing to return to work, and are instead remaining off collecting unemployment benefits. This has frustrated many employers, and Ohio Governor DeWine recently stepped in to address the issue.

In particular, Governor DeWine issued an Executive Order specifying that employees who refuse