As the coronavirus pandemic continues to disrupt multiple facets of life across the United States, questions continue to arise related to working parents caring for school aged children. On Friday, June 26, 2020, the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued two Field Assistance Bulletins FIELD ASSISTANCE BULLETIN No. 2020-3 (FAB No. 2020-3) and FIELD ASSISTANCE BULLETIN

On March 25 the Department of Labor (“DOL”) released the Families First Coronavirus Response Act’s (FFCRA) required notice poster that will need to be posted at many workplaces. The DOL also issued a FAQ to explain employer obligations associated with the posting. Unfortunately, these publications both raise additional questions.

First, there appears to be an

A few weeks ago, we explained how the DOL clarified the regular overtime rate for the first time in 50 years. This month, the DOL issued its first significant update to the joint employer rule under the FLSA in more than 60 years.

On January 12, 2020 the DOL issued a Final Rule narrowing the

For the first time in 50 years the Department of Labor has issued a Final Rule attempting to clarify the overtime regular rate. The Final Rule focuses primarily on clarifying whether certain kinds of benefits or “perks,” and other miscellaneous items must be included in the regular rate. Since the DOL’s last overtime regular rate

No later than September 30, 2019, employers with 100 or more employees must file EEO-1 Component 2 to report workforce pay data for the years 2017 and 2018.  In light of the approaching deadline, we want to update employers briefly on the status of the reporting obligation, offer some key tips for compliance, and finally,

The National Labor Relations Board (the “Board” or “NLRB”) has issued notice that it will propose a new rule establishing that students who perform any services for compensation, including, but not limited to, teaching or research, at a private college or university in connection with their studies are not “employees” within the meaning of Section

Recent reports of campaigns designed to discourage potential employers from hiring Trump Administration officials raise the question of whether a private sector employer would have any jeopardy for going along with such a boycott. The answer depends upon where the act takes place. Fifteen states,[1] plus Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, prohibit

Last month we discussed a developing story regarding employer requirements to provide pay data on EEO-1 reports – more formerly known as Component 2. As we discussed, on March 4, 2019, The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ordered the immediate reinstatement of the EEOC’s pay data collection provisions (requiring covered employers to