Travis focuses his practice on the representation of management in all aspects of labor and employment law. He has represented management in front of various state and federal administrative agencies, as well as state and federal court. Travis advises and counsels management on topics including leave management, discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. Travis further provides training to clients on a variety of issues including the interaction between the ADA and FMLA, sexual harassment, and workplace conduct. He has experience in litigation and public sector bargaining. Travis has worked for the State of Ohio’s Office of Collective Bargaining where he responded to unfair labor practice charges and assisted in grievance step hearings, mediations, and arbitrations.

Wage transparency laws are getting more and more popular, and employers should expect this trend to continue. These laws are designed to correct the gender pay gap and, generally, require an employer to publish the salary range for the job position being advertised.

For example, Washington and New York City recently joined Colorado in requiring

The United States Supreme Court (“SCOTUS”) issued its decisions on the Biden Administration’s testing and vaccination mandates earlier today. The court was divided in both cases. The court ruled 6-3 in blocking the Occupational Health and Safety Administration’s (“OSHA”) Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”) which required that employers with 100 or more employees require employees to

Return to work procedures and vaccine mandates have consumed much of Human Resources’ attention over the past year. However, there are other areas of the law that employers should continue to monitor. For example, California recently passed Senate Bill 331 (“SB 331”) which limits an employer’s ability to use non-disparagement, non-disclosure, and confidentiality agreements. Specifically,

Non-compete agreements have recently become a popular focus of the federal and state governments. Several weeks ago, President Biden issued an Executive Order, “Promoting Competition in the American Economy” which asked the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) to exercise the FTC’s statutory rulemaking authority to curtail the unfair use of non-compete agreements and other

Recently, President Biden issued an Executive Order titled, “Promoting Competition in the American Economy.” Notably, among other things, the Executive Order recommends that the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) curtail the use of non-compete agreements.

The Executive Order seeks to “. . . address agreements that may unduly limit workers’ ability to change jobs”

On April 15, Governor DeWine announced that more than 36 percent of Ohioans have now received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine – which is good news for returning to normalcy and work. However, we shouldn’t expect a return to normalcy over the next several weeks as Ohio’s statewide case incidence number has

As the COVID-19 vaccine becomes available across the country, companies are facing critical decisions as they create policies and/or plan for the transition back to work. Below is a list of questions and best practices Frantz Ward attorneys frequently discuss with clients related to key issues facing returning to the office.

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Last week, Ohio House Bill 352 (the “Employment Law Uniformity Act”) was signed into law. The Employment Law Uniformity Act, updates Ohio’s anti-discrimination statute, shortens the relevant statutory periods of limitation, and prevents the simultaneous filing of administrative and judicial actions, among other things. The act also codifies an employer’s affirmative defense for sexual harassment

Recently, the Ohio Supreme Court held that employers can use the direct-observation method of drug testing, without violating an employee’s privacy rights, provided that the employee consents to the test. The court also noted that an employer can terminate an employee for refusing to consent to that drug test.

In that case, Lunsford v. Sterilite