I. Introduction
On March 18, 2020, the President signed The Emergency Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“Bill”) into law. The Bill responds to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and provides for two new, overlapping paid leave requirements for employers. The first is an amendment to the FMLA, while the other is a separate new,

On March 14, 2020, the U.S. House of Representatives passed The Emergency Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201) (“House Bill”) in response to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). The House Bill provides for two new, overlapping paid leave requirements for employers: (1) the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act, (2) the Emergency

Recently, an Ohio federal court rejected an individual’s claim of entitlement to FMLA leave to care for his sister’s children. In Brede v. Apple Comput. Inc., N.D. Ohio No. 1:19-cv-2130, 2020 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 11275 (Jan. 23, 2020), the plaintiff argued that his former employer interfered with and retaliated against him for using FMLA

On April 12, 2018, the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the Department of Labor reinstituted its practice of issuing opinion letters, providing the Agency’s interpretation of discrete issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Obama administration had suspended the longstanding practice nearly a decade ago. Two of the opinion letters issued on April

In general, the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) provides that eligible employees may take twelve weeks of unpaid leave in a twelve-month period for the serious health condition of the employee, the employee’s spouse, the employee’s parents or the employee’s children. Thus, if an employee normally works five, eight-hour days a week, and the