At the beginning of the pandemic, many employers began to require employees to be screened for COVID-19 symptoms prior to starting work. Common screenings include daily temperature checks and symptom questionnaires, as well as questions about recent travel or recent exposure to COVID-19. Predictably, lawsuits have started to surface by employees alleging state and federal

The transportation industry awaits a decision by the Ninth Circuit in Commissioner for the State of California v. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Nos. 19-70413, 18-73488, 19-70323 and 19-70329, as to whether the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Order in December 2018 that California’s meal and rest break rules are preempted by the Federal

On January 27, a campaign to amend the Ohio Constitution and raise Ohio’s minimum wage – led by Ohioans for Raising the Wage – took an important step forward when Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost certified that the campaign’s summary of its proposed constitutional amendment was “fair and truthful.” To summarize, the proposed amendment would:

For the first time in 50 years the Department of Labor has issued a Final Rule attempting to clarify the overtime regular rate. The Final Rule focuses primarily on clarifying whether certain kinds of benefits or “perks,” and other miscellaneous items must be included in the regular rate. Since the DOL’s last overtime regular rate

On Monday, October 7, 2019, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued new proposed rules regarding the circumstances in which employers may (1) apply a “tip credit” to satisfy their minimum-wage obligations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and (2) permit non-tipped employees to participate in mandatory tip-pooling arrangements.

1. The Proposed Rules abolish the

On April 1, the U.S. Department of Labor proposed a new regulation for determining a company’s joint employer status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. When two companies are deemed joint employers, they share responsibility for the workers’ wages, which include the payment of minimum wages and overtime. Under the new rule, the Labor Department

Administering payroll for employees with variable work schedules and hourly rates can cause major headaches for employers. In an effort to simplify and reduce administrative costs, employers are oftentimes tempted to set a standard overtime rate to be paid at a set dollar amount to all employees regardless of variations in compensation rates and actual

On April 12, 2018, the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the Department of Labor reinstituted its practice of issuing opinion letters, providing the Agency’s interpretation of discrete issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Obama administration had suspended the longstanding practice nearly a decade ago. Two of the opinion letters issued on April