Recently, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) announced a settlement it “secured” which required a company to rescind certain work rules and pay two discharged employees $297,000. Of note, the workers were not discharged for violating the alleged unlawful work rules. In addition, the workplace was not unionized and no union organizing activity had occurred.

In a move that gave hope to many business groups, a federal judge in Texas temporarily blocked a controversial new National Labor Relations Board “joint employer” rule on February 22. The new rule, which had been set to take effect on February 26, is designed to make it easier for the NLRB to label businesses

We previously reported in August on the National Labor Relations Board’s decision in Cemex Construction Materials Pacific, NLRB Case No. 28-CA-230115, 327 NLRB No. 130 (August 25, 2023), wherein the Board overruled long-standing precedent and adopted a new scheme to provide labor unions with an easier path to unionizing a company. 
 
On Tuesday, November

The NLRB this week once again ruled that a relatively common employment practice violated federal labor law, continuing what some are seeing as a trend under the current administration. This time, the NLRB ruled that it was illegal for an employer to offer employees a severance agreement that prohibited them from making disparaging statements about

In March of 2020, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the Board”) finalized a rule that substantially overhauled certain parts of NLRB election procedures thereby providing additional protections to the rights of workers with respect to their ability to choose whether or not they wanted to be represented by a union.

More specifically, in

On October 3, 2022, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that employers must continue deducting union dues from employees’ paychecks, pursuant to their labor contracts, even after the contracts expire. The case is Valley Hospital Medical Center, Inc., N.L.R.B. Case 28-CA-213783 (Valley Hospital II).

Dues checkoff previously served as an exception to

On March 7, 2022 NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo asked the NLRB to overturn Board precedent related to employee handbook rules.

The case at issue is Stericycle, Inc., which examines whether certain workplace rules infringe upon or restrict employees’ rights under the NLRA. As part of the Board’s proceedings, the parties (and interested third

On December 27, 2021, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) invited public briefing on a critical issue affecting employers (and especially gig economy companies and workers) regarding independent contractor status. In 2019, the republican-controlled NLRB in SuperShuttle DFW, Inc., 367 NLRB 75 (2019), made it easier for employers to prove independent contractor status by reaffirming