As the November election draws closer, employers are facing the daunting challenge of keeping peace among employees with differing political affiliations. One approach to this challenge involves simply banning certain types of political expression in the workplace. While this approach can work well if it is done correctly, it can cause significant legal issues if

On June 17, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) updated its Technical Assistance Questions and Answers to clarify that employers may not require COVID-19 antibody testing before permitting employees to re-enter the workplace. Antibody tests can show whether the subject had a past infection or has recovered from the virus that causes COVID-19. Currently,

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“Social media has been responsible for blurring the lines a lot between employees personal lives and their professional lives,” Christina Niro said.

Niro warned that in times of turmoil, many companies nationwide are cracking down on their social media conduct

Public support for cannabis reform – whether to legalize medical or adult use marijuana or hemp and hemp-derived products – is at an all-time high. While marijuana reform is moving slowly at the federal level, the federal government legalized hemp and its derivatives as part of the 2018 Farm Bill.

Now, companies from Martha Stewart

Reposted from a Litigation client alert.

A recent $44 million jury verdict in state court in Chicago serves as a stark warning to companies who hire employees that might bring trade secrets from their former employers to their new position. The lesson: take concrete steps to ensure a new employee doesn’t share or use those

This week, the United States Supreme Court agreed to consider whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of gay and transgender status.

The Court will consider this issue in the context of three cases: Two involve claims that employees were fired because of their sexual orientation.

On April 1, the U.S. Department of Labor proposed a new regulation for determining a company’s joint employer status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. When two companies are deemed joint employers, they share responsibility for the workers’ wages, which include the payment of minimum wages and overtime. Under the new rule, the Labor Department

Private employers with more than 100 employees previously have been required to report workforce data across 10 job categories broken down by race, gender and ethnicity. The data is reported annually by October 1 to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) on the EEO-1 form, which currently comprises one page for each facility of