While most Americans were out preparing for Christmas last week, the NLRB had some presents of its own.  For employers, the Board postponed its posting rule (which created a new unfair labor practice and potentially extended the statute of limitations) from January 31 to April 30, 2012.  For unions, the Board issued a decision that

The NLRB has postponed the effective date for its new union organization rights posting requirement until January 31, 2012.  In its press release, the Board states that it decided to postpone the requirement, “in order to allow for enhanced education and outreach to employers, particularly those who operate small and medium sized businesses.”  Further

The NLRB published today its new poster regarding employees rights to form labor unions under the NLRA, mentioned in our prior blog posting.  A copy is available here

Meanwhile, the National Association of Manufacturers has filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the rule, stating that “[t]he Board’s promulgation of the Rule is in

In 1987, the NLRB held that a newspaper did not have to bargain with a union over its ethics policy, on the grounds that ensuring public confidence in its news reporting was a “core function” of the paper. Peerless Publications, 283 NLRB 334 (1987).  In 2006, Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle unilaterally implemented an

The Department of Labor has been taking aggressive steps to prevent employers from exercising their rights to provide information to their employees during union campaigns.  Under the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, employers must disclose the amounts they spend on consultants either attempting to influence their employees about the choice of unionization or providing information

The NLRB has now settled the “Facebook” complaint that has gained great attention.  See Cleveland.com Article.  In NLRB v. American Medical Response of Connecticut, Inc., the Board took the position that the employer violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated an employee for making nasty statements about her supervisor on Facebook.  The NLRB’s rationale