Hiring, Discipline and Termination

Recently, the Ohio Supreme Court held that employers can use the direct-observation method of drug testing, without violating an employee’s privacy rights, provided that the employee consents to the test. The court also noted that an employer can terminate an employee for refusing to consent to that drug test.

In that case, Lunsford v. Sterilite

In 2019, McDonald’s Corporation fired its CEO Steve Easterbrook after it learned he had an inappropriate relationship with a subordinate employee. The relationship came to light when the subordinate employee reported that she engaged in a consensual relationship with Easterbrook that involved explicit text messages and photographs, but no physical contact.  Naturally, McDonald’s investigated the

WEWS News Channel 5 Cleveland

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Excerpts from the story:

“Social media has been responsible for blurring the lines a lot between employees personal lives and their professional lives,” Christina Niro said.

Niro warned that in times of turmoil, many companies nationwide are cracking down on their social media conduct

McDonald’s recent termination of its highly-regarded CEO Steve Easterbrook provides employers with another high-profile reminder of shifting attitudes regarding workplace romances, even voluntary ones.  As most are now aware, McDonald’s board of directors determined that their CEO had violated company policy and shown “poor judgment” by having a romantic relationship with a subordinate employee.

While

The Ohio Supreme Court today issued a knockout punch to public authorities seeking to enforce local-hiring requirements on public-construction projects.

In 2003, the Cleveland City Council enacted what is generally known as the “Fannie Lewis Law.” The much-disputed law required public-construction contracts valued at $100,000 or more to include a provision mandating that Cleveland residents

As of January 1, 2019, Connecticut and Hawaii have joined the ranks of California, Delaware, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Vermont by adopting state-wide bans against salary history inquires. State and local governments across the country are increasingly introducing and passing legislation prohibiting employers from asking candidates their salary history information, with

On Friday, Target agreed to pay $3.74 million and review its policies for screening job applicants to settle Carnella Times et al. v. Target Corp., a class action in the Southern District of New York challenging the company’s use of background checks. The suit claimed that Target’s use of criminal background checks violated Title

In recent weeks, reports of sexual harassment allegations against high-profile individuals have emerged on an almost daily basis. From Hollywood A-listers, to politicians, to celebrity chefs, the list of powerful individuals accused of sexual harassment and assault continues to grow. As a result, the national conversation surrounding the topic of sexual harassment in the workplace

183809648-57a54ae55f9b58974ab92602As my colleague Keith Ashmus recently noted, most employers currently ask job applicants for their salary histories. This is a reasonable question, and one that employers find useful to help attract and retain talented employees. Given recent legislative initiatives and judicial decisions on this topic, however, employers should tread carefully.

In the past few