On March 18, 2022, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the CROWN Act (“Creating a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair”) which bans hairstyle discrimination in employment, public accommodations, federally assisted programs and housing programs. The act bans discrimination against braids, dreadlocks, curls and the like. Advocates of the bill say a split in

On March 7, 2022 NLRB General Counsel Jennifer Abruzzo asked the NLRB to overturn Board precedent related to employee handbook rules.

The case at issue is Stericycle, Inc., which examines whether certain workplace rules infringe upon or restrict employees’ rights under the NLRA. As part of the Board’s proceedings, the parties (and interested third

Although the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team’s pay discrimination settlement this week was notable for its $24 million price tag, it is also notable because it highlights the very real risk that employers face over unequal pay practices.

Members of the USWNT originally filed the case in 2019 accusing U.S. Soccer (the sport’s governing body)

Last week, the Senate passed the Ending Forced Arbitration of Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Act of 2021 (H.R. 4445) (the “Act”), which prohibits the enforcement of mandatory arbitration agreements in connection with sexual harassment and sexual assault claims. The measure had previously passed in the House on February 7th. Although President Biden has not

The Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) began the new year with a rate reduction for Ohio’s public employers, estimating that those employers will pay nearly $17 million less in workers’ compensation insurance premiums next year thanks to the cut. The BWC announced that this 10% rate reduction was made possible by a decline in injury

Shortly after taking office in January, 2021, President Biden created the White House Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment. The Task Force’s mission is to develop policies, programs and practices to promote worker organizing and collective bargaining. It is chaired by Vice President Harris, its vice chair is Labor Secretary Marty Walsh, and its

Did the federal government overreach when it issued emergency rules forcing employers to impose vaccine mandates? The United States Supreme Court will take up that important question today when it examines emergency COVID-19 vaccine rules issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

The Supreme Court

A recent barrage of federal injunctions has caused substantial confusion for employers who were preparing to comply with federal vaccine mandates, including mandates involving OSHA, CMS and federal contractors. As a result, many covered employers are re-evaluating their plans to take the following points into consideration:

  1. The federal injunctions stop the government from forcing certain

As we all know by now, on November 5, 2021, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued an Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) to protect workers in businesses with more than 100 employees from the Coronavirus, and on November 6, 2021, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals stayed enforcement of the ETS. B.S.T. Holdings, LLC,

Return to work procedures and vaccine mandates have consumed much of Human Resources’ attention over the past year. However, there are other areas of the law that employers should continue to monitor. For example, California recently passed Senate Bill 331 (“SB 331”) which limits an employer’s ability to use non-disparagement, non-disclosure, and confidentiality agreements. Specifically,