Employee handbooks are vital tools employers use to communicate expectations for employee conduct, company culture and core values, policies, and procedures. However, when drafted poorly, handbooks can create confusion and legal liability. Below are some of the most common mistakes employers make in their employee handbooks, and how to fix them.

  1. Inadvertently creating an employment

Prescription medications are a necessary, albeit expensive component of any self-insured workers’ compensation program. Unfortunately, injured workers are often prescribed unnecessary prescription drugs which can lead to dangerous health conditions and increased complexity of workers’ compensation claims. Physicians continue to prescribe and dispense opioids which are the most expensive therapy class in workers’ compensation. Studies

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court ruled in Helix Energy Solutions Group, Inc. v. Hewitt that an employee who earned more than $200,000 a year was not exempt from overtime pay under the FLSA’s highly compensated employee exemption.

The highly compensated employee exemption applies to employees who meet all the following criteria:

  • Perform office or non-manual

The NLRB this week once again ruled that a relatively common employment practice violated federal labor law, continuing what some are seeing as a trend under the current administration. This time, the NLRB ruled that it was illegal for an employer to offer employees a severance agreement that prohibited them from making disparaging statements about

Fighting and Horseplay in the Workplace
When thinking about injuries at the workplace, many of the first things that often come to mind are single-employee accidents like slips and trips, muscle strains from lifting heavy objects, or cuts and bruises from sometimes-improper use of machinery. But what happens when an employee’s work injuries are caused

We previously reported that disability advocates for many years had been asking for action with respect to the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) tools, as it is estimated that approximately 80% of employers use some form of automated tool to screen candidates. To that end, on May 12, 2022, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

In the midst of a national labor shortage, employers recruiting from a shrinking pool of potential employees are looking for ways to gain a competitive edge over other employers. What’s a better job perk than having every Friday off?

Companies nationwide, including an Ohio construction and real estate company, are beginning to implement 4-day work

On January 26, 2023, OSHA issued two enforcement memoranda accompanied by a clear message to employers from Assistant Secretary for OSHA Doug Parker: employers who “choose to put profits before their employees’ safety, health and wellbeing” will be targeted.  Aggressively.

OSHA’s first memorandum revises and significantly expands its seldom used instance-by-instance (“IBI”) policy.  The decision

On November 22, 2022, a Virginia Walmart employee reportedly opened fire in a staff break room, killing six co-workers and injuring several others. On January 23, 2023, a California mushroom farm employee shot and killed seven people at two locations, one of which was his place of employment.  These tragedies are just two examples of

As part of its $1.7 trillion end-of-year spending bill, Congress passed two laws that provide new rights and protections for pregnant workers and nursing mothers – the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA) and the Providing Urgent Maternal Protections for Nursing Mothers Act (PUMP Act).  Summaries of each law are provided below.

PWFA

Modeled after the