This post was coauthored by Inna Shelley.

The National Labor Relations Board decision in the Specialty Healthcare case has continued paving the way for the certification of increasingly fragmented micro bargaining units. On May 4th, the director of NLRB Region 2 approved a collective bargaining unit of full-time and part-time salespersons in the women’s shoe

The Office of the General Counsel for the NLRB has recently updated its memo summarizing recent social media decisions.  The memo provides a reference for employers regarding the limitations on disciplining or terminating employees based on comments they make on FaceBook and other social media sites.

The first case summary in the memo is telling. 

While most Americans were out preparing for Christmas last week, the NLRB had some presents of its own.  For employers, the Board postponed its posting rule (which created a new unfair labor practice and potentially extended the statute of limitations) from January 31 to April 30, 2012.  For unions, the Board issued a decision that

The NLRB has postponed the effective date for its new union organization rights posting requirement until January 31, 2012.  In its press release, the Board states that it decided to postpone the requirement, “in order to allow for enhanced education and outreach to employers, particularly those who operate small and medium sized businesses.”  Further

The NLRB published today its new poster regarding employees rights to form labor unions under the NLRA, mentioned in our prior blog posting.  A copy is available here

Meanwhile, the National Association of Manufacturers has filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the rule, stating that “[t]he Board’s promulgation of the Rule is in

The Los Angeles Times reported today that a mob of hundreds of International Longshore and Warehouse Union members, alerted by a posting on the Union’s Facebook page, overpowered police and attacked a train carrying grain to a new storage facility in Longview, Washington.  According to the article, the union members cut brake lines on the