Employment Litigation Issues

Yes, federal law prohibits employers from discriminating against employees and applicants based on their sexual orientation. Yes, employers who allow discrimination or harassment based on sexual orientation can be forced to pay a full range of damages, including punitive damages.

Employment and civil rights lawyers have struggled to find clear answers to these questions for

By now most employers are (hopefully) aware that the U.S. Department of Labor has significantly changed some of the rules governing exemptions from the overtime pay requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). The revised regulations will go into effect on December 1, 2016, and they will principally do the following:

  • Immediately double the

The U.S. Supreme Court’s June 1, 2015 decision in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, Inc., 575 U.S. __ (2015), signals to employers that employment decisions based upon neutral policies may run afoul of Title VII, where the policy’s application limits an individual’s religious beliefs or practices. Such is the case even when the individual

Does your company provide email access to its employees? Are there restrictions on how and when email may be used? These issues are addressed in the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) December 11, 2014 decision in Purple Communications, Inc., which affects both non-union and union employers. In Purple Communications, the NLRB reversed its

On December 9, 2014, the United States Supreme Court in Integrity Staffing Solutions, Inc. v. Busk unanimously held that time spent going through mandatory security screening at the conclusion of one’s shift is not compensable time under the Fair Labor Stands Act (“FLSA”), even if the security screening takes as long as 25 minutes. Reversing

Following last year’s issuance by the EEOC of controversial criminal background check guidelines, the EEOC has filed a number of lawsuits attempting to enforce these guidelines.  Late last week, Judge Roger Titus, United States District Court District of Maryland, dismissed the lawsuit EEOC filed against Freeman, holding that the EEOC failed to present a prima

This post was co-authored by Inna Shelley.

Employers should have counsel review their non-compete agreements in order to ensure that a merger or other restructuring would not affect the successor company’s right to enforce the agreement.  On May 24, the Ohio Supreme Court decided Accordia of Ohio, LLC v. Fischel, a case in which

The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently affirmed a district court’s summary judgment dismissal on behalf of our client, USF Holland.  The disability discrimination case involved a truck driver who sought to switch from a city driver to a line-haul driver position based on his claim that he could not perform

I was called for jury duty this past week in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, and served on the jury of a brief civil trial featuring a pro se Plaintiff and a lawnmower dispute.  Years ago, I had tried an employment case before the same Judge.  The experience was fascinating.  Here is what I learned (or had