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Andrew's practice focuses on employment law and labor relations. He advises and represents employers in a broad range of matters, including discrimination, harassment, retaliation, misappropriation of trade secrets, and breaches of non-competition and other types of employment agreements. Andrew has appeared on behalf of management in state and federal courts and before arbitrators and various administrative agencies. Andrew also has represented employers in traditional labor matters, including at arbitrations and before the National Labor Relations Board and State Employment Relations Board.

When not involved in active litigation, Andrew counsels employers of all sizes on key issues, such as employee discipline, employee handbook and policy development, leave administration, wage and hour compliance, union organizing efforts, and various aspects of the collective bargaining process. Andrew also drafts employment agreements and state-specific policies.

The Department of Justice has claimed its first victory in attacking “no-poach” agreements after a Nevada staffing company pled guilty and was sentenced to pay $134,000.  The case arose out of a concerted effort by the Federal Trade Commission and DOJ, first announced in 2016, to target companies who enter into agreements with competitors to

Recently, a staffing company agreed to, among other things, pay Massachusetts $230,000 to settle a lawsuit related to a data breach.  In December 2020, the staffing company learned that its network had been compromised.  It received communication from a third-party who encrypted files in the staffing company’s network and threatened to publicly release sensitive data. 

Even though the calendar has not even turned to February, we already have seen major updates on the federal government’s COVID-19 rules and guidance.  This past week proved no different.  On Friday, January 21, 2022, a Texas federal judge blocked, on a nationwide basis, President Biden’s executive order mandating that federal workers get a COVID-19

Under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), certain individuals are eligible to receive fully subsidized COBRA coverage for a six-month period which began on April 1, 2021. The APRA also requires that employers notify affected individuals of this benefit by May 31, 2021. Thankfully, last week, the Department of Labor issued template notices and a

Recently, one federal court of appeals validated an employer’s decision to discharge an employee for posting a racially charged political statement on social media. In particular, the employee (a white Nashville emergency dispatcher) made a Facebook post related to President Trump’s victory following the 2016 election that included racial slurs. The employee subsequently removed the

On April 1, the U.S. Department of Labor proposed a new regulation for determining a company’s joint employer status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. When two companies are deemed joint employers, they share responsibility for the workers’ wages, which include the payment of minimum wages and overtime. Under the new rule, the Labor Department

Feel like the government shutdown has reduced news coming out of the federal administrative agencies? If so, January 17, 2019 likely provided a spark to your week. Last Thursday, National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) Chairman John Ring issued a letter which served as the most-recent move in the NLRB’s joint employer dance.

In his letter,

A federal court of appeals recently ruled that, standing alone, full-time presence at the workplace is not an essential function of a job. In the case, an HR Generalist returned to work part-time while suffering from postpartum depression and separation anxiety. Initially, the employer accommodated the employee by allowing her to work five half-days per